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Biochim Biophys Acta. 1990 Apr 9;1052(1):143-51.

Kinetics of phosphorylation of Na+/K(+)-ATPase by protein kinase C.

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  • 1Department of Physiological Chemistry, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine, Madison.

Abstract

The kinetics of phosphorylation of an integral membrane enzyme, Na+/K(+)-ATPase, by calcium- and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) were characterized in vitro. The phosphorylation by PKC occurred on the catalytic alpha-subunit of Na+/K(+)-ATPase in preparations of purified enzyme from dog kidney and duck salt-gland and in preparations of duck salt-gland microsomes. The phosphorylation required calcium (Ka approximately 1.0 microM) and was stimulated by tumor-promoting phorbol ester (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate) in the presence of a low concentration of calcium (0.1 microM). PKC phosphorylation of Na+/K(+)-ATPase was rapid and plateaued within 30 min. The apparent Km of PKC for Na+/K(+)-ATPase as a substrate was 0.5 microM for dog kidney enzyme and 0.3 microM for duck salt-gland enzyme. Apparent substrate inhibition of PKC activity was observed at concentrations of purified salt-gland Na+/K(+)-ATPase greater than 1.0 microM. Phosphorylation of purified kidney and salt-gland Na+/K+ ATPases occurred at both serine and threonine residues. The 32P-phosphopeptide pattern on 15% sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after hydroxylamine cleavage of pure 32P-phosphorylated alpha subunit was the same for the two sources of enzyme, which suggests that the phosphorylation sites are similar. The results indicate that Na+/K(+)-ATPase may serve as a substrate for PKC phosphorylation in intact cells and that the Na+/K(+)-ATPase could be a useful in vitro model substrate for PKC interaction with integral membrane proteins.

PMID:
2157496
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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