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Am J Prev Med. 2011 Jun;40(6):620-4. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2011.02.021.

Influenza vaccine delivery delays from the perspective of primary care physicians.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital, 12477 E 19th Avenue, Aurora CO 80045, USA. o'leary.sean@tchden.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The effects of delayed influenza vaccine delivery on primary practices are currently unknown.

PURPOSE:

To describe, among primary care physicians nationally regarding the 2006-2007 influenza season: (1) how physicians defined influenza vaccine delay; (2) the extent of reported vaccine delays; and (3) the perceived effects of vaccine delays.

METHODS:

Between March and June 2007, a total of 1268 primary care physicians nationally were surveyed.

RESULTS:

Survey response was 74% (n=940). The majority of physicians (79%) defined "influenza vaccine delay" as not receiving vaccine by November 1. Fifty-three percent reported a vaccine delay. Providers reported the following as effects of delays: reduced satisfaction of patients or parents in the practice (72%); decreased percentage in their practice who received the vaccination (65%); disruption of scheduling influenza clinics (55%); increased referral of patients elsewhere for vaccination (55%); and negative financial impact caused by unused vaccine (46%). Those who reported experiencing delays more often reported not meeting demand for vaccine (adjusted risk ratio [ARR]=1.83, 95% CI=1.64, 2.07); that grocery stores, retail outlets, or pharmacies had vaccine before their practices did (ARR=1.82, 95% CI=1.53, 2.26); not receiving all vaccine that was ordered (ARR=1.19, 95% CI=1.06, 1.36); and having leftover vaccine (ARR=1.17, 95% CI=1.04, 1.32).

CONCLUSIONS:

During the 2006-2007 influenza season, a non-shortage season, the majority of respondents reported experiencing an influenza vaccine delivery delay. Experiencing a delay was thought to decrease vaccination use, increase referrals elsewhere, and have a negative financial impact on practices. Delayed delivery of influenza vaccine is disruptive for primary care practices, and it consequently may affect vaccination coverage.

Copyright © 2011 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21565653
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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