Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Health Psychol. 2011 May;30(3):285-94. doi: 10.1037/a0021980.

Physical activity program delivery by professionals versus volunteers: the TEAM randomized trial.

Author information

  • 1Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, USA. cync@stanford.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Older adults have low rates of physical activity participation, but respond positively to telephone-mediated support programs. Programs are often limited by reliance on professional staff. This study tested telephone-based physical activity advice delivered by professional staff versus trained volunteer peer mentors.

DESIGN:

A 12-month, randomized, controlled clinical trial was executed from 2003-2008. Twelve volunteer peer mentors and 181 initially inactive adults ages 50 years and older were recruited from the San Francisco Bay Area. Participants were randomized to: (1) telephone-based physical activity advice delivered by professional staff, (2) telephone-based physical activity advice delivered by trained volunteer peers, or (3) an attention-control arm of staff-delivered telephone support for nutrition.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Moderate-intensity or more vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was assessed at baseline, 6, and 12 months with the Community Healthy Activities Model Program for Seniors (CHAMPS) Questionnaire, with accelerometry validation (Actigraph) in a randomly selected subsample. Treatment fidelity was examined through analysis of quantity and quality of intervention delivery.

RESULTS:

At 6 and 12 months, both physical activity arms significantly increased MVPA relative to the control arm. Both physical activity arms were comparable in quantity of intervention delivery, but peers demonstrated more versatility and comprehensiveness in quality of intervention content.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study demonstrates that trained peer volunteers can effectively promote physical activity increases through telephone-based advice. The results support a program delivery model with good dissemination potential for a variety of community settings.

(c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

PMID:
21553972
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3092123
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (2)Free text

Figure 1
Figure 2
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for American Psychological Association Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk