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J Biol Chem. 2011 Jul 1;286(26):22991-3002. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M110.204271. Epub 2011 May 6.

N-linked glycosylation regulates human proteinase-activated receptor-1 cell surface expression and disarming via neutrophil proteinases and thermolysin.

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  • 1Division of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Studies, University of Hull, Hull York Medical School, East Yorkshire, HU16 5JQ, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Proteinase-activated receptor 1 (PAR(1)) induces activation of platelet and vascular cells after proteolytic cleavage of its extracellular N terminus by thrombin. In pathological situations, other proteinases may be generated in the circulation and might modify the responses of PAR(1) by cleaving extracellular domains. In this study, epitope-tagged wild-type human PAR(1) (hPAR(1)) and a panel of N-linked glycosylation-deficient mutant receptors were permanently expressed in epithelial cells (Kirsten murine sarcoma virus-transformed rat kidney cells and CHO cells). We have analyzed the role of N-linked glycosylation in regulating proteinase activation/disarming and cell global expression of hPAR(1). We reported for the first time that glycosylation in the N terminus of hPAR(1) downstream of the tethered ligand (especially Asn(75)) governs receptor disarming to trypsin, thermolysin, and the neutrophil proteinases elastase and proteinase 3 but not cathepsin G. In addition, hPAR(1) is heavily N-linked glycosylated and sialylated in epithelial cell lines, and glycosylation occurs at all five consensus sites, namely, Asn(35), Asn(62), Asn(75), Asn(250), and Asn(259). Removing these N-linked glycosylation sequons affected hPAR(1) cell surface expression to varying degrees, and N-linked glycosylation at extracellular loop 2 (especially Asn(250)) of hPAR(1) is essential for optimal receptor cell surface expression and receptor stability.

PMID:
21550978
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3123067
Free PMC Article
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