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Patient Educ Couns. 2011 Sep;84(3):368-78. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2011.04.006. Epub 2011 May 8.

Tailored information for cancer patients on the Internet: effects of visual cues and language complexity on information recall and satisfaction.

Author information

  • 1Department of Communication Sciences, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. j.c.m.vanweert@uva.nl

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study was designed to investigate the effects of visual cues and language complexity on satisfaction and information recall using a personalised website for lung cancer patients. In addition, age effects were investigated.

METHODS:

An experiment using a 2 (complex vs. non-complex language)×3 (text only vs. photograph vs. drawing) factorial design was conducted. In total, 200 respondents without cancer were exposed to one of the six conditions.

RESULTS:

Respondents were more satisfied with the comprehensibility of both websites when they were presented with a visual cue. A significant interaction effect was found between language complexity and photograph use such that satisfaction with comprehensibility improved when a photograph was added to the complex language condition. Next, an interaction effect was found between age and satisfaction, which indicates that adding a visual cue is more important for older adults than younger adults. Finally, respondents who were exposed to a website with less complex language showed higher recall scores.

CONCLUSION:

The use of visual cues enhances satisfaction with the information presented on the website, and the use of non-complex language improves recall.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

The results of the current study can be used to improve computer-based information systems for patients.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21550757
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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