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Sleep. 2011 May 1;34(5):575-80.

Short or long sleep duration is associated with memory impairment in older Chinese: the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study.

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  • 1Department of Community Medicine, School of Public Health, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

To examine the association between sleep-related factors and memory impairment.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study

SETTING:

Community-based study in Guangzhou, China.

PARTICIPANTS:

28,670 older Chinese (20,776 women and 7,894 men) aged 50 to 85 years.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

Demographic and socioeconomic data, sleep-related factors, and cognitive function were collected by face-to-face interview. Potential confounders, such as employment and occupational status, smoking, alcohol and tea use, physical activity, self-rated health, anthropometry, blood pressure, and fasting plasma glucose and lipids were measured. After adjusting for multiple potential confounders, an inverted U-shaped association between sleep duration and delayed word recall test (DWRT) score, a validated measure of memory impairment, was found, with 7 to 8 h of habitual sleep duration showing the highest score (P-values for trend from 3 to 7 h and from 7 to ≥ 10 h were all ≤ 0.001). Compared to sleep duration of 7 h, the adjusted odds ratio for memory impairment from the sleep duration of 3 to 4 or ≥ 10 h was 1.29 (95% confidence interval 1.07-1.56) and 1.52 (1.25-1.86), respectively. Subjects with daily napping, morning tiredness, or insomnia had significantly lower DWRT scores than those without (P ranged from < 0.001 to 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS:

Short or long sleep duration was an important sleep-related factor independently associated with memory impairment and may be a useful marker for increased risk of cognitive impairment in older people.

KEYWORDS:

Sleep; insomnia; memory impairment; napping; sleep duration

PMID:
21532950
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3079936
Free PMC Article
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