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Nucleic Acids Res. 2011 Aug;39(15):6646-59. doi: 10.1093/nar/gkr242. Epub 2011 Apr 27.

Native homing endonucleases can target conserved genes in humans and in animal models.

Author information

  • 1Department of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv 69978, Israel. abarzel@stanford.edu

Abstract

In recent years, both homing endonucleases (HEases) and zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) have been engineered and selected for the targeting of desired human loci for gene therapy. However, enzyme engineering is lengthy and expensive and the off-target effect of the manufactured endonucleases is difficult to predict. Moreover, enzymes selected to cleave a human DNA locus may not cleave the homologous locus in the genome of animal models because of sequence divergence, thus hampering attempts to assess the in vivo efficacy and safety of any engineered enzyme prior to its application in human trials. Here, we show that naturally occurring HEases can be found, that cleave desirable human targets. Some of these enzymes are also shown to cleave the homologous sequence in the genome of animal models. In addition, the distribution of off-target effects may be more predictable for native HEases. Based on our experimental observations, we present the HomeBase algorithm, database and web server that allow a high-throughput computational search and assignment of HEases for the targeting of specific loci in the human and other genomes. We validate experimentally the predicted target specificity of candidate fungal, bacterial and archaeal HEases using cell free, yeast and archaeal assays.

PMID:
21525128
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3159444
Free PMC Article
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