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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 May 31;108(22):9262-7. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1104836108. Epub 2011 Apr 25.

Antidepressant effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are attenuated by antiinflammatory drugs in mice and humans.

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  • 1Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA. jschmidt@rockefeller.edu

Erratum in

  • Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Jul 5;108(27):11297.

Abstract

Antiinflammatory drugs achieve their therapeutic actions at least in part by regulation of cytokine formation. A "cytokine hypothesis" of depression is supported by the observation that depressed individuals have elevated plasma levels of certain cytokines compared with healthy controls. Here we investigated a possible interaction between antidepressant agents and antiinflammatory agents on antidepressant-induced behaviors and on p11, a biochemical marker of depressive-like states and antidepressant responses. We found that widely used antiinflammatory drugs antagonize both biochemical and behavioral responses to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). In contrast to the levels detected in serum, we found that frontal cortical levels of certain cytokines (e.g., TNFα and IFNγ) were increased by serotonergic antidepressants and that these effects were inhibited by antiinflammatory agents. The antagonistic effect of antiinflammatory agents on antidepressant-induced behaviors was confirmed by analysis of a dataset from a large-scale real-world human study, "sequenced treatment alternatives to relieve depression" (STAR*D), underscoring the clinical significance of our findings. Our data indicate that clinicians should carefully balance the therapeutic benefits of antiinflammatory agents versus the potentially negative consequences of antagonizing the therapeutic efficacy of antidepressant agents in patients suffering from depression.

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PMID:
21518864
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3107316
Free PMC Article

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