Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Matern Child Health J. 2012 May;16(4):807-13. doi: 10.1007/s10995-011-0787-8.

Singleton preterm birth: risk factors and association with assisted reproductive technology.

Author information

  • 1National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. ntepper@cdc.gov

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to determine risk factors for early (less than 34 weeks gestation) and late (34-36 weeks gestation) preterm singleton birth, by assisted reproductive technology (ART) status. We linked data from Massachusetts birth records and ART records representing singleton live births from 1997 through 2004. Using multinomial regression models, we assessed risk factors for early and late preterm birth by ART status. From 1997 to 2004 in Massachusetts, among non-ART births, risk factors for early and late preterm birth were similar and included women <15 and ≥ 35 years of age, those of non-white race or Hispanic ethnicity, those with ≤ 12 years of education, those with chronic diabetes, those with gestational diabetes, those with gestational hypertension, those who smoked during pregnancy, those who used fertility medications, and those who had not had a previous live birth. Among ART births, risk factors for early and late preterm birth differed and odds of early preterm birth were increased among women with ≤ 12 years of education while odds of late preterm birth were increased among women with gestational diabetes. Odds of both early and late preterm birth were increased among women of non-white race or Hispanic ethnicity and among women with gestational hypertension. Among non-ART births, increased risk for preterm birth was more strongly related to socioeconomic factors than among ART births. Medical conditions were associated with an increased risk for preterm birth regardless of women's ART status. Efforts to prevent preterm births should focus on reducing modifiable risk factors.

PMID:
21516300
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Springer
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk