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Psychol Sport Exerc. 2011 Jan 1;12(1):54-60.

Environment and Physical Activity Dynamics: The Role of Residential Self-selection.

Author information

  • 1University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 123 West Franklin St. CB#8120; Chapel Hill, NC 27516-3997.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Within the socio-ecologic framework, diet and physical activity are influenced by individual, interpersonal, organizational, community, and public policy factors. A basic principle underlying this framework is that environments can influence an individual's behavior. However, in the vast majority of cross-sectional and even the few longitudinal studies of this relationship, the question of whether individuals select their area of residence based on physical activity-related amenities is ignored. In this paper, we address a critical methodological issue: self-selection of residential location, which is generally not accounted for, and can significantly compromise research on the relationship between environmental factors and physical activity behaviors.

METHOD:

We define and discuss the problem of residential self-selection in the study of neighborhood influences on health and health behavior, review methods used to control for residential self-selection in the literature, and present our strategy for addressing this potentially important source of bias.

CONCLUSION:

Existing research has built our understanding of residential self-selection bias, but important gaps remain. Our strategy uses data from a longitudinal cohort study linked to contemporaneous environmental measures to create a multi-equation model system to simultaneously estimate residential choice, environmental influences on physical activity, and downstream health outcomes such as obesity and clinical cardiovascular disease risk factor measures.

PMID:
21516236
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3079234
Free PMC Article
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