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Am J Health Promot. 2011 May-Jun;25(5 Suppl):eS1-15. doi: 10.4278/ajhp.100616-QUAN-200.

Distinct beliefs, attitudes, and experiences of Latino smokers: relevance for cessation interventions.

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  • 1Department of Psychology, University of Colorado Denver, Campus Box 173, PO Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364, USA.



Determine the extent to which Latino smokers are using effective interventions for smoking cessation, with particular focus on nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). Related aims were to explore cultural, attitudinal, knowledge, and socioeconomic variables associated with treatment use.


Cross-sectional telephone survey of two groups of Colorado adult smokers: Latinos (n = 1010) and non-Latino whites (n = 519).




Computer-assisted telephone survey in either Spanish or English. Survey addressed sociodemographic variables; smoking and cessation history; knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about smoking and quitting; and experiences in and attitudes toward the health care setting.


Latino and non-Latino white adult Colorado residents who reported being regular smokers.


Colorado Latinos report using NRT substantially less often than do non-Latino whites residing in the state. This and other differences in the study were more pronounced in Latinos characterized as low acculturation on the basis of a language preference variable. Latinos smoke somewhat less than non-Latino whites and report lower levels of dependence. They appear to be motivated to quit but endorse attitudes and beliefs antithetical to NRT use. Health care access was lower among Latinos, and this was related to lower reports of lifetime NRT use. Receipt of recommended practitioner intervention (the "five As") did not differ by ethnicity.


Results suggested that use of effective cessation interventions among Latinos may be enhanced by education about nicotine addiction and NRT. Policy change to increase health care access also showed promise.

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