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Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 2011 Mar;120(3):175-84.

Assessment of canine vocal fold function after injection of a new biomaterial designed to treat phonatory mucosal scarring.

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  • 1Department of Surgery, Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Most cases of irresolvable hoarseness are due to deficiencies in the pliability and volume of the superficial lamina propria of the phonatory mucosa. By using a US Food and Drug Administration-approved polymer, polyethylene glycol (PEG), we created a novel hydrogel (PEG30) and investigated its effects on multiple vocal fold structural and functional parameters.

METHODS:

We injected PEG30 unilaterally into 16 normal canine vocal folds with survival times of 1 to 4 months. High-speed videos of vocal fold vibration, induced by intratracheal airflow, and phonation threshold pressures were recorded at 4 time points per subject. Three-dimensional reconstruction analysis of 11.7 T magnetic resonance images and histologic analysis identified 3 cases wherein PEG30 injections were the most superficial, so as to maximally impact vibratory function. These cases were subjected to in-depth analyses.

RESULTS:

High-speed video analysis of the 3 selected cases showed minimal to no reduction in the maximum vibratory amplitudes of vocal folds injected with PEG30 compared to the non-injected, contralateral vocal fold. All PEG30-injected vocal folds displayed mucosal wave activity with low average phonation threshold pressures. No significant inflammation was observed on microlaryngoscopic examination. Magnetic resonance imaging and histologic analyses revealed time-dependent resorption of the PEG30 hydrogel by phagocytosis with minimal tissue reaction or fibrosis.

CONCLUSIONS:

The PEG30 hydrogel is a promising biocompatible candidate biomaterial to restore form and function to deficient phonatory mucosa, while not mechanically impeding residual endogenous superficial lamina propria.

PMID:
21510143
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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