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J Clin Anesth. 2011 May;23(3):189-96. doi: 10.1016/j.jclinane.2010.08.012. Epub 2011 Apr 14.

Capnography enhances surveillance of respiratory events during procedural sedation: a meta-analysis.

Author information

  • 1Department of Clinical and Diagnostic Sciences, School of Health Professions, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA. waughj@uab.edu

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVE:

To determine if capnography, in addition to standard monitoring, identified more respiratory complications than standard monitoring alone.

DESIGN:

Meta-analysis.

SETTING:

University medical center.

MEASUREMENTS:

The electronic databases PubMed, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library (Cochrane Reviews, CENTRAL) were searched for studies published between 1995-2009 reporting adverse respiratory events during procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) with clearly defined end-tidal carbon dioxide threshold, adult population, clear study design, P-value calculation, similar outcome and predictor variable definitions, and binary independent and dependent variable raw data. Five such studies were evaluated independently. A meta-analysis of these studies was performed.

MAIN RESULTS:

During PSA, cases of respiratory depression were 17.6 times more likely to be detected if monitored by capnography than cases not monitored by capnography (95% CI, 2.5-122.1; P < 0.004).

CONCLUSION:

End-tidal carbon dioxide monitoring is an important addition in detecting respiratory depression during PSA.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21497076
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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