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Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011 Jan;144(1):108-13. doi: 10.1177/0194599810390893.

Effects of surface dehydration on mucosal wave amplitude and frequency in excised canine larynges.

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  • 1University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Madison, WI 53706, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Evaluate the effect of vocal fold surface dehydration on mucosal wave amplitude and frequency.

STUDY DESIGN:

Controlled test-retest.

SETTING:

Larynges were mounted on an excised larynx phonation system and attached to a pseudolung in a triple-walled sound-attenuated room that eliminated background noise and maintained a stabilized room temperature and humidity level.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

High-speed video was recorded for 8 excised canine larynges during exposure to dehumidified air at 20 cm H(2)O. Control trials consisted of high-speed videos recorded for 2 excised canine larynges during exposure to humidified air at the same pressure.

RESULTS:

In the majority of larynges, increased levels of dehydration were correlated with decreased amplitude and frequency. The slope of the linear regression fitted to the change in amplitude (P = .003) and the percent change (P < .001) between the initial and final trials were significantly decreased in dehydrated larynges. These measurements with respect to the change in frequency were also significantly decreased in dehydrated larynges (P < .001; P = .027).

CONCLUSION:

Vocal fold surface dehydration caused a decrease in mucosal wave amplitude and frequency. This study provides objective, quantitative support for the mechanism of voice deterioration observed after extreme surface dehydration.

PMID:
21493398
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3187924
Free PMC Article
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