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Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2011 Nov;218(1):169-77. doi: 10.1007/s00213-011-2284-6. Epub 2011 Apr 13.

Ethanol concentration-dependent effects and the role of stress on ethanol drinking in corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 and double type 1 and 2 receptor knockout mice.

Author information

  • 1Behavioral Neuroscience Department and Portland Alcohol Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA.

Abstract

RATIONALE:

Exposure to stressors promotes ethanol (EtOH) consumption and enhances drug craving during abstinence. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), and in particular, CRF actions via type 1 CRF receptors (CRF(1)) are critical in behavioral responses to stressors. CRF(1) play a role in EtOH-induced behavioral neuroadaptation, in binge-like EtOH consumption, and in heightened EtOH consumption in dependent animals.

OBJECTIVES:

We investigated the involvement of CRF(1) in swim-stress-induced changes in EtOH consumption and in baseline consumption as a function of EtOH concentration. The role of CRF(2) in adapting to effects of the stressor was also examined.

METHODS:

Wild-type mice and knockout mice lacking CRF(1) were tested for two-bottle choice EtOH consumption at concentrations of 3-20%. Also, intake of 10% EtOH was examined in wild-type mice and knockout mice lacking CRF(1), or lacking both CRF(1) and CRF(2), before and after acute or repeated swim stress exposures.

RESULTS:

EtOH intake was reduced in CRF(1) compared with wild-type mice when presented at a concentration of 20% but not when presented at lower concentrations. No genotype-dependent effects were found for saccharin or quinine drinking. Acute swim stress had no effect, but repeated swim stress resulted in higher levels of EtOH consumption in wild-type mice, compared with both types of knockout mice. Stress effects on EtOH drinking were longer lasting in double knockout mice.

CONCLUSIONS:

These data suggest a prominent role of CRF(1) in stressor-induced changes in EtOH consumption, with involvement of CRF(2) in recovery from stressor effects.

PMID:
21487655
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3312392
Free PMC Article

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