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Biomed Opt Express. 2011 Feb 28;2(4):717-38. doi: 10.1364/BOE.2.000717.

Optical properties of the mouse eye.

Abstract

The Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWS) spots upon which ocular aberration measurements depend have poor quality in mice due to light reflected from multiple retinal layers. We have designed and implemented a SHWS that can favor light from a specific retinal layer and measured monochromatic aberrations in 20 eyes from 10 anesthetized C57BL/6J mice. Using this instrument, we show that mice are myopic, not hyperopic as is frequently reported. We have also measured longitudinal chromatic aberration (LCA) of the mouse eye and found that it follows predictions of the water-filled schematic mouse eye. Results indicate that the optical quality of the mouse eye assessed by measurement of its aberrations is remarkably good, better for retinal imaging than the human eye. The dilated mouse eye has a much larger numerical aperture (NA) than that of the dilated human eye (0.5 NA vs. 0.2 NA), but it has a similar amount of root mean square (RMS) higher order aberrations compared to the dilated human eye. These measurements predict that adaptive optics based on this method of wavefront sensing will provide improvements in retinal image quality and potentially two times higher lateral resolution than that in the human eye.

KEYWORDS:

(110.1080) Active or adaptive optics; (170.4460) Medical optics and biotechnology: Ophthalmic optics and devices; (330.4300) Vision system - noninvasive assessment; (330.5370) Vision, color, and visual optics: Physiological optics; (330.7324) Vision, color, and visual optics: Visual optics, comparative animal models

PMID:
21483598
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3072116
Free PMC Article
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