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JAMA. 2011 Apr 20;305(15):1545-52. doi: 10.1001/jama.2011.468. Epub 2011 Apr 11.

Detection of chronic kidney disease with creatinine, cystatin C, and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio and association with progression to end-stage renal disease and mortality.

Author information

  • 1Department of Medicine, San Francisco VA Medical Center, San Francisco, California, USA. carmenalicia.peralta@ucsf.edu

Abstract

CONTEXT:

A triple-marker approach for chronic kidney disease (CKD) evaluation has not been well studied.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate whether combining creatinine, cystatin C, and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) would improve identification of risks associated with CKD compared with creatinine alone.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

Prospective cohort study involving 26,643 US adults enrolled in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study from January 2003 to June 2010. Participants were categorized into 8 groups defined by estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) determined by creatinine and by cystatin C of either <60 or ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and ACR of either <30 or ≥30 mg/g.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

All-cause mortality and incident end-stage renal disease with median follow-up of 4.6 years.

RESULTS:

Participants had a mean age of 65 years, 40% were black, and 54% were women. Of 26,643 participants, 1940 died and 177 developed end-stage renal disease. Among participants without CKD defined by creatinine, 24% did not have CKD by either ACR or cystatin C. Compared with those with CKD defined by creatinine alone, the hazard ratio for death in multivariable-adjusted models was 3.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0-5.6) for participants with CKD defined by creatinine and ACR; 3.2 (95% CI, 2.2-4.7) for those with CKD defined by creatinine and cystatin C, and 5.6 (95% CI, 3.9-8.2) for those with CKD defined by all biomarkers. Among participants without CKD defined by creatinine, 3863 (16%) had CKD detected by ACR or cystatin C. Compared with participants who did not have CKD by any measure, the HRs for mortality were 1.7 (95% CI, 1.4-1.9) for participants with CKD defined by ACR alone, 2.2 (95% CI, 1.9-2.7) for participants with CKD defined by cystatin C alone, and 3.0 (95% CI, 2.4-3.7) for participants with CKD defined by both measures. Risk of incident end-stage renal disease was higher among those with CKD defined by all markers (34.1 per 1000 person-years; 95% CI, 28.7-40.5 vs 0.33 per 1000 person-years; 95% CI, 0.05-2.3) for those with CKD defined by creatinine alone. The second highest end-stage renal disease rate was among persons missed by the creatinine measure but detected by both ACR and cystatin C (rate per 1000 person-years, 6.4; 95% CI, 3.6-11.3). Net reclassification improvement for death was 13.3% (P < .001) and for end-stage renal disease was 6.4% (P < .001) after adding estimated GFR cystatin C in fully adjusted models with estimated GFR creatinine and ACR.

CONCLUSION:

Adding cystatin C to the combination of creatinine and ACR measures improved the predictive accuracy for all-cause mortality and end-stage renal disease.

Comment in

PMID:
21482744
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3697771
Free PMC Article

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