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Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2012 Apr;22(2):190-8. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0838.2011.01292.x. Epub 2011 Apr 8.

Effects of whole-body cryotherapy (-110 °C) on proprioception and indices of muscle damage.

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  • 1Department of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, University of Limerick, Castletroy, Limerick, Ireland. joseph.costello@ul.ie

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) on proprioceptive function, muscle force recovery following eccentric muscle contractions and tympanic temperature (T(TY) ). Thirty-six subjects were randomly assigned to a group receiving two 3-min treatments of -110 ± 3 °C or 15 ± 3 °C. Knee joint position sense (JPS), maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of the knee extensors, force proprioception and T(TY) were recorded before, immediately after the exposure and again 15 min later. A convenience sample of 18 subjects also underwent an eccentric exercise protocol on their contralateral left leg 24 h before exposure. MVIC (left knee), peak power output (PPO) during a repeated sprint on a cycle ergometer and muscles soreness were measured pre-, 24, 48 and 72h post-treatment. WBC reduced T(TY) , by 0.3 °C, when compared with the control group (P<0.001). However, JPS, MVIC or force proprioception was not affected. Similarly, WBC did not effect MVIC, PPO or muscle soreness following eccentric exercise. WBC, administered 24 h after eccentric exercise, is ineffective in alleviating muscle soreness or enhancing muscle force recovery. The results of this study also indicate no increased risk of proprioceptive-related injury following WBC.

© 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

PMID:
21477164
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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