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Am Heart J. 2011 Apr;161(4):719-25. doi: 10.1016/j.ahj.2010.12.019.

Projected impact of polypill use among US adults: Medication use, cardiovascular risk reduction, and side effects.

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  • 1Department of Epidemiology and Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 35294, USA. pmuntner@uab.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Polypills, which include multiple medications for reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in a single pill, have been proposed for population-wide use. The number of US adults eligible for polypills and potential benefits are unknown.

METHODS:

The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2004 and 2007-2008 were analyzed to estimate treatment rates for medications proposed for inclusion in polypills (aspirin, statin, an angiotensin-converting enzyme [ACE] inhibitor, and a thiazide-type diuretic for those without and a β-blocker for those with a history of myocardial infarction) among US adults. The number of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke events potentially prevented through polypill use was projected by published meta-analyses and 3 large population-based cohort studies. Two polypill eligibility criteria were analyzed: (1) US adults ≥55 years and (2) US adults with a history of CVD.

RESULTS:

There are 67.6 million US adults ≥55 years and 15.4 million US adults with a history of CVD and, thus, eligible for polypills using the 2 outlined criteria. In 2007 to 2008, 37.3% of US adults ≥55 years and 57.0% of those with a history of CVD were taking statins. Use of other polypill medications was also low. Polypill use by US adults aged ≥55 years is projected to potentially prevent 3.2 million CHD events and 1.7 million strokes over 10 years. Among those with a history of CVD, the potential to prevent of 0.9 million CHD events and 0.5 million strokes is projected.

CONCLUSIONS:

Polypills have the potential to lower CVD incidence substantially among US adults.

Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21473971
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3093765
Free PMC Article

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