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J Biol Chem. 2011 May 27;286(21):18795-806. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M111.224345. Epub 2011 Apr 1.

Pattern recognition scavenger receptor CD204 attenuates Toll-like receptor 4-induced NF-kappaB activation by directly inhibiting ubiquitination of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 6.

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  • 1Department of Human and Molecular Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298, USA.

Abstract

The collaboration and cross-talk between different classes of innate pattern recognition receptors are crucial for a well coordinated inflammatory response and host defense. Here we report a previously unrecognized role of scavenger receptor A (SRA; also known as CD204) as a signaling regulator in the context of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation. We show that SRA/CD204 deficiency leads to greater sensitivity to LPS-induced endotoxic shock. SRA/CD204 down-regulates inflammatory gene expression in dendritic cells by suppressing TLR4-induced activation of the transcription factor NF-κB. For the first time, we demonstrate that SRA/CD204 executes its regulatory functions by directly interacting with the TRAF-C domain of TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), resulting in inhibition of TRAF6 dimerization and ubiquitination. The attenuation of NF-κB activity by SRA/CD204 is independent of its ligand-binding domain, indicating that the signaling-regulatory feature of SRA/CD204 can be uncoupled from its conventional endocytic functions. Collectively, we have identified the molecular linkage between SRA/CD204 and the TLR4 signaling pathways, and our results reveal a novel mechanism by which a non-TLR pattern recognition receptor restricts TLR4 activation and consequent inflammatory response.

PMID:
21460221
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3099696
Free PMC Article
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