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Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2011 Sep;45(4):258-64. doi: 10.3109/00365599.2011.560007. Epub 2011 Mar 31.

Noble metal alloy-coated latex versus silicone Foley catheter in short-term catheterization: a randomized controlled study.

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  • 1Urology Department , University Hospital of Skane, Malmö , Sweden. karin.stenzelius@skane.se

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The primary aim of this study was to compare the incidence of catheter-associated bacteriuria with a noble metal alloy-coated latex catheter or a non-coated silicone catheter in patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery with short-term catheterization. Secondary objectives included identifying risk factors for bacteriuria and catheter-associated urinary tract symptoms.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

The study compared 217 patients randomized to and receiving a silicone catheter with 222 patients treated with a coated latex catheter. Before removal of the catheter a sample for urinary culture was obtained. Bacteriuria was defined as the growth of ≥100 000 cfu/ml. A logistic regression model was used to identify risk groups for bacteriuria. Patients were interviewed about urinary tract symptoms during and after catheterization.

RESULTS:

The incidence of bacteriuria was 1.5% with the coated latex catheter and 5.5% with the silicone catheter (p = 0.027) after a mean period of 2 days' catheterization time. Female gender (odds ratio 6.02) and obesity (odds ratio 5.08) were significant risk factors for bacteriuria. A quarter of the patients reported at least one symptom from the urinary tract during and after catheterization. Most patients defined the symptoms as "yes, a little" and a few consulted a healthcare professional because of the symptoms.

CONCLUSION:

This study confirmed previous results that the noble metal alloy coating significantly reduces the risk of catheter-associated bacteriuria in short-term catheterization (1-3 days). Female gender and obesity were significant risk factors for developing bacteriuria, while the use of an open drainage system and insertion of the catheter on the ward were not.

PMID:
21452931
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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