Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Perinatol. 2011 Apr;31 Suppl 1:S68-71. doi: 10.1038/jp.2010.186.

Effects of delayed cord clamping in very-low-birth-weight infants.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Women and Infants' Hospital, 101 Dudley Street, Providence, RI 02905, USA.



Delayed cord clamping (DCC) may be beneficial in very-preterm and very-low-birth-weight infants.


This study was a randomized unmasked controlled trial. It was performed at three centers of the NICHD (National Institute of Child Health and Human Development) Neonatal Research Network. DCC in very-preterm and very-low-birth-weight infants will result in an increase in hematocrit levels at 4 h of age. Infants with a gestational age of 24 to 28 weeks were randomized to either early cord clamping (<10 s) or DCC (30 to 45 s). The primary outcome was venous hematocrit at 4 h of age. Secondary outcomes included delivery room management, selected neonatal morbidities and the need for blood transfusion during the infants' hospital stay.


A total of 33 infants were randomized: 17 to the immediate cord clamping group (cord clamped at 7.9±5.2 s, mean±s.d.) and 16 to the DCC (cord clamped at 35.2±10.1 s) group. Hematocrit was higher in the DCC group (45±8% vs 40±5%, P<0.05). The frequency of events during delivery room resuscitation was almost identical between the two groups. There was no difference in the hourly mean arterial blood pressure during the first 12 h of life; there was a trend in the difference in the incidence of selected neonatal morbidities, hematocrit at 2, 4 and 6 weeks, as well as the need for transfusion, but none of the differences was statistically significant.


A higher hematocrit is achieved by DCC in very-low-birth-weight infants, suggesting effective placental transfusion.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk