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BJU Int. 2011 Nov;108(10):1566-71. doi: 10.1111/j.1464-410X.2011.010171.x. Epub 2011 Mar 28.

Do pelvic dimensions and prostate location contribute to the risk of experiencing complications after radical prostatectomy?

Author information

  • 1Urology Service, Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA. frabbani@montefiore.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess if pelvic size, such as a narrow, steep pelvis, as well as prostate location in relation to the pelvic anatomy might have an impact on the likelihood of experiencing complications after radical prostatectomy.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

In a standardized manner, different bony and soft tissue dimensions on preoperative staging MRI were retrospectively measured in a study cohort of 934 patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Measurements were defined aimed at assessing pelvic size and prostate location. Medical and surgical complications after radical prostatectomy were meticulously reviewed and grouped into subcategories to assess whether a narrow, steep pelvis and an anatomically deeply situated prostate (which is thought to be more surgically challenging) might be associated with a higher likelihood of postoperative complications. Multivariate Cox regression was performed to assess if dimensions have a significant impact on the likelihood of postoperative complications.

RESULTS:

While known parameters such as a higher preoperative PSA and presence of comorbidities were associated with an increased risk of experiencing complications after surgical treatment, none of the dimensions assessed on preoperative MRI had a significant impact on the development of any medical or surgical complication.

CONCLUSION:

We report the largest cohort of patients where pelvic dimensions were evaluated in a standardized manner on preoperative MRI aimed at assessing anatomic factors and their impact on complications after radical prostatectomy. None of the measurements could significantly predict the likelihood of developing medical or surgical complications.

© 2011 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2011 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

PMID:
21443652
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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