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J Neurovirol. 2011 Apr;17(2):159-65. doi: 10.1007/s13365-011-0023-8. Epub 2011 Mar 25.

A comparison of performance-based measures of function in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

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  • 1Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Abstract

The objectives of this study are to compare the results of newer performance-based functional assessments in the study of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) and to correlate these functional assessments with specific levels of severity of HAND. One hundred fourteen HIV+ subjects in an existing cohort were evaluated with a medical history, neurological exam, neuropsychological test battery as well as subjective and novel objective measures of functional abilities. Self-reported measures of functional performance included the Karnofsky Performance Scale, a questionnaire for instrumental activities of daily living, and a questionnaire for physical quality of life measures. The newer objective functional performance assessments included the Columbia Medication Management and the San Diego Finances tests. These newer performance-based measures of function were assessed for their ability to predict level of HAND. The two objective measures of functional performance, The Columbia Medication Management Scale and the San Diego Finances Test, were both associated with levels of severity of HAND. The Karnofsky Performance Scale and the questionnaires for role and physical quality of life were subjective measures that were also associated with specific levels of HAND. Newer measures of functional performance can be used to objectively evaluate functional impairment in HAND and validate different levels of HAND.

PMID:
21437751
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4022137
Free PMC Article

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