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J Clin Nurs. 2012 Feb;21(3-4):388-97. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2011.03701.x. Epub 2011 Mar 25.

First-time mothers: social support, maternal parental self-efficacy and postnatal depression.

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  • 1Catherine McAuley School of Nursing and Midwifery, Brookfield Health Sciences Complex, University College,Cork, Ireland. patricia.leahy@ucc.ie

Abstract

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

To examine the relationships between social support, maternal parental self-efficacy and postnatal depression in first-time mothers at 6 weeks post delivery.

BACKGROUND:

Social support conceptualised and measured in different ways has been found to positively influence the mothering experience as has maternal parental self-efficacy. No research exists which has measured the relationships between social support, underpinned by social exchange theory and maternal parental self-efficacy using a domain-specific instrument, underpinned by self-efficacy theory and postnatal depression, with first-time mothers at 6 weeks post delivery.

DESIGN:

A quantitative correlational descriptive design was used.

METHOD:

Data were collected using a five-part questionnaire package containing a researcher developed social support questionnaire, the Perceived Maternal Parental Self-Efficacy Scale and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Four hundred and ten mothers completed questionnaires at 6 weeks post delivery.

RESULTS:

Significant relationships were found between functional social support and postnatal depression; informal social support and postnatal depression; maternal parental self-efficacy and postnatal depression and informal social support and maternal parental self-efficacy at 6 weeks post delivery.

CONCLUSION:

Nurses and midwives need to be aware of and acknowledge the significant contribution of social support, particularly from family and friends in positively influencing first-time mothers' mental health and well-being in the postpartum period. The development of health care policy and clinical guidelines needs to define and operationalise social support to enhance maternal parental self-efficacy.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

These findings suggest that nurses and midwives need to be cognisant of the importance of social support for first-time mothers in both enhancing maternal parental self-efficacy and reducing postnatal depressive symptomatology in the early postpartum period.

© 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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