Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Prev Med. 2011 Apr;40(4):434-9. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2010.12.019.

Geographic distribution of diagnosed diabetes in the U.S.: a diabetes belt.

Author information

  • 1CDC, Atlanta, Georgia 30341, USA. lsb8@cdc.gov

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The American "stroke belt" has contributed to the study of stroke. However, U.S. geographic patterns of diabetes have not been as specifically characterized.

PURPOSE:

This study identifies a geographically coherent region of the U.S. where the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes is especially high, called the "diabetes belt."

METHODS:

In 2010, data from the 2007 and 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were combined with county-level diagnosed diabetes prevalence estimates. Counties in close proximity with an estimated prevalence of diagnosed diabetes ≥11.0% were considered to define the diabetes belt. Prevalence of risk factors in the diabetes belt was compared to that in the rest of the U.S. The fraction of the excess risk associated with living in the diabetes belt associated with selected risk factors, both modifiable (sedentary lifestyle, obesity) and nonmodifiable (age, gender, race/ethnicity, education), was calculated.

RESULTS:

A diabetes belt consisting of 644 counties in 15 mostly southern states was identified. People in the diabetes belt were more likely to be non-Hispanic African-American, lead a sedentary lifestyle, and be obese than in the rest of the U.S. Thirty percent of the excess risk was associated with modifiable risk factors, and 37% with nonmodifiable factors.

CONCLUSIONS:

Nearly one third of the difference in diabetes prevalence between the diabetes belt and the rest of the U.S. is associated with sedentary lifestyle and obesity. Culturally appropriate interventions aimed at decreasing obesity and sedentary lifestyle in counties within the diabetes belt should be considered.

Published by Elsevier Inc.

PMID:
21406277
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk