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J Adolesc Health. 2011 Apr;48(4):415-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2010.07.012. Epub 2010 Sep 22.

Cyber and traditional bullying: differential association with depression.

Author information

  • 1Division of Epidemiology, Statistics, and Prevention Research, Prevention Research Branch, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. wangji2@mail.nih.gov

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The study compared levels of depression among bullies, victims, and bully-victims of traditional (physical, verbal, and relational) and cyber bullying that is a relatively new form of bullying. The study also examined the association between depression and frequency of involvement in each form of bullying.

METHODS:

A U.S. nationally representative sample of students in grades 6-10 (N = 7,313) completed the bullying and depression items in the Health Behavior in School-Aged Children 2005 Survey.

RESULTS:

Depression was associated with each of the four forms of bullying. Cyber victims reported higher depression than bullies or bully-victims, a result not observed in other forms of bullying. For physical, verbal, and relational bullies, the frequently-involved group of victims and bully victims reported a significantly higher level of depression than the corresponding occasionally involved group. For cyber bullying, differences were found only between the occasional and frequent victims.

CONCLUSION:

Results indicated the importance of further study of cyber bullying because its association with depression was distinct from traditional forms of bullying.

Published by Elsevier Inc.

PMID:
21402273
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3058261
Free PMC Article

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