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PLoS One. 2011 Mar 2;6(3):e16839. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0016839.

A two-gene balance regulates Salmonella typhimurium tolerance in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

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  • 1School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, West Midlands, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Lysozymes are antimicrobial enzymes that perform a critical role in resisting infection in a wide-range of eukaryotes. However, using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a model host we now demonstrate that deletion of the protist type lysozyme LYS-7 renders animals susceptible to killing by the fatal fungal human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, but, remarkably, enhances tolerance to the enteric bacteria Salmonella Typhimurium. This trade-off in immunological susceptibility in C. elegans is further mediated by the reciprocal activity of lys-7 and the tyrosine kinase abl-1. Together this implies a greater complexity in C. elegans innate immune function than previously thought.

PMID:
21399680
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3047536
Free PMC Article

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