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Abdom Imaging. 2012 Feb;37(1):91-7. doi: 10.1007/s00261-011-9720-2.

Incidentally discovered solid pancreatic masses: imaging and clinical observations.

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  • 1Department of Radiology, Stanford University, CA 94305-5105, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to review the CT findings and clinical outcome in patients with incidentally discovered solid pancreatic masses.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Over an 8-year period, from 2001 to 2009, we identified 24 patients with solid pancreatic masses incidentally detected by CT. There were 13 females and 11 males, with a mean age of 67 years. We determined the indication for initial CT, analyzed the CT features, and ascertained the clinical follow-up in all the patients.

RESULTS:

All of the solid masses were malignant. There were 14 adenocarcinomas and 10 neuroendocrine tumors. The most common indications for the initial CT were surveillance of an extrapancreatic malignancy (n = 10) and evaluation for hematuria (n = 6). On the initial CT, 16 of the patients (67%) had a clearly visible pancreatic mass. In eight patients isoattenuating masses were identified, only recognized by subtle signs including unexplained dilatation of the pancreatic duct (n = 5) or minimal contour deformity or density of the pancreas (n = 3). The mean survival time for the patients with adenocarcinoma was 21.6 months, and 42 months for the patients with neuroendocrine tumors.

CONCLUSION:

Although uncommon, incidentally discovered solid pancreatic masses are malignant neoplasms, either ductal adenocarcinomas or neuroendocrine tumors. Unlike incidentally discovered small cystic lesions, solid pancreatic lesions are often biologically aggressive.

PMID:
21394600
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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