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J Pediatr. 2011 Aug;159(2):248-55.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2011.01.029. Epub 2011 Mar 10.

Urinary bromotyrosine measures asthma control and predicts asthma exacerbations in children.

Author information

  • 1Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the usefulness of urinary bromotyrosine, a noninvasive marker of eosinophil-catalyzed protein oxidation, in tracking with indexes of asthma control and in predicting future asthma exacerbations in children.

STUDY DESIGN:

Children with asthma were recruited consecutively at the time of clinic visit. Urine was obtained, along with spirometry, exhaled nitric oxide, and Asthma Control Questionnaire data. Follow-up phone calls were made 6 weeks after enrollment.

RESULTS:

Fifty-seven participants were enrolled. Urinary bromotyrosine levels tracked significantly with indexes of asthma control as assessed by Asthma Control Questionnaire scores at baseline (R = 0.38, P = .004) and follow-up (R = 0.39, P = .008). Participants with high baseline levels of bromotyrosine were 18.1-fold (95% CI 2.1-153.1, P = .0004) more likely to have inadequately controlled asthma and 4.0-fold more likely (95% CI 1.1-14.7, P = .03) to have an asthma exacerbation (unexpected emergency department visit; doctor's appointment or phone call; oral or parenteral corticosteroid burst; acute asthma-related respiratory symptoms) over the ensuing 6 weeks. Exhaled nitric oxide levels did not track with Asthma Control Questionnaire data; and immunoglobulin E, eosinophil count, spirometry, and exhaled nitric oxide levels failed to predict asthma exacerbations.

CONCLUSIONS:

Urinary bromotyrosine tracks with asthma control and predicts the risk of future asthma exacerbations in children.

Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21392781
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3354913
Free PMC Article

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