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Cancer. 2011 Aug 15;117(16):3658-69. doi: 10.1002/cncr.25961. Epub 2011 Mar 8.

Triple-negative breast cancer in Hispanic patients: high prevalence, poor prognosis, and association with menopausal status, body mass index, and parity.

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  • 1Breast Cancer Clinic, National Cancer Institute (INCan), Mexico City, Mexico.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is defined as breast cancer that is negative for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. TNBC represents 15% of all invasive breast cancers, but some studies have suggested that its prevalence differs between races. To the authors' knowledge, no previous studies have determined the prevalence of TNBC and its risk factors among Hispanic women.

METHODS:

The authors identified 2074 Hispanic women with breast cancer who attended the National Cancer Institute in Mexico City from 1998 to 2008. All histopathologic and immunohistochemical diagnoses were rereviewed by a breast cancer pathologist. The prevalence of TNBC, its association with clinicopathologic characteristics, and its prognostic impact were determined.

RESULTS:

The median patient age at diagnosis (±standard deviation) was 50 ± 12 years. The overall prevalence of TNBC was 23.1%. Younger age (P < .001), premenopausal status (P = .002), increased parity (P = .029), hormonal contraceptive use (P = .04) high histologic grade (P < .001), and advanced disease (P < .001) were associated independently with TNBC. Postmenopausal patients who had a body mass index (BMI) <25 kg/m(2) (P = .027) or <30 kg/m(2) (P < .001) were more likely to have TNBC. In multivariate analysis, patients with TNBC had a higher risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR), lower disease-free survival (DFS) (hazard ratio, 1.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-2.32; P = .009), and a lower cancer-specific survival (CSS) rate (hazard ratio, 1.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.20-2.30; P = .002) than patients with non-TNBC.

CONCLUSIONS:

The median age at diagnosis of Hispanic women with breast cancer was 11 years younger than the average age reported in the United States. The prevalence of TNBC in this study population was higher than that reported in white women with breast cancer. TNBC was associated with a higher risk of LRR and with lower DFS and CSS than those in patients with non-TNBC.

Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

PMID:
21387260
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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