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Eur Radiol. 2011 Jul;21(7):1509-16. doi: 10.1007/s00330-011-2089-3. Epub 2011 Mar 6.

Predictive factors for new onset or progression of knee osteoarthritis one year after trauma: MRI follow-up in general practice.

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  • 1Department of Radiology, Maasstad Ziekenhuis, Postbus 9100, 3007 AC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To prospectively evaluate prognostic factors for new onset or progression of degenerative change on follow-up MRI one year after knee trauma and the association with clinical outcome.

METHODS:

Within a prospective observational cohort study in general practice, we studied a subgroup of 117 patients with acute knee trauma (mean age 41 years, 43% women). Degenerative change was scored on MRI at baseline and after one year follow-up. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate prognostic factors for new onset or progressive degenerative change on follow-up MRI. Association between new or progressive degeneration and clinical outcome after one year was assessed.

RESULTS:

On follow-up MRI 15% of patients with pre-existing knee osteoarthritis showed progression and 26% of patients demonstrated new degenerative change. The only statistically significant prognostic variable in the multivariate analysis was bone marrow oedema on initial MRI (OR 5.29 (95% CI 1.64-17.1), p = 0.005). A significant association between new or progressive degenerative change and clinical outcome was found (p = 0.003).

CONCLUSION:

Bone marrow oedema on MRI for acute knee injury is strongly predictive of new onset or progression of degenerative change of the femorotibial joint on follow-up MRI one year after trauma, which is reflected in clinical outcome.

PMID:
21380741
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3101345
Free PMC Article

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