Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011 Sep;43(9):1785-90. doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e318216d90f.

Ethnic bias in anthropometric estimates of DXA abdominal fat: the TIGER study.

Author information

  • 1Texas Obesity Research Center, Department of Health and Human Performance, University of Houston, Houston, TX, USA. doconnor2@uh.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND/INTRODUCTION:

The purpose of this study was to examine the race/ethnicity bias of using waist circumference (WC) to estimate abdominal fat.

METHODS:

A total of 771 females and 484 males (17-35 yr) were tested one to three times during a prescribed 30-wk aerobic exercise program. The race/ethnicity distribution for women was non-Hispanic white, 29%; Hispanic, 25%; African American (AA), 35%; Asian Indian, 3%; and Asian, 8%. The distribution for men was non-Hispanic white, 37%; Hispanic, 26%; AA, 22%; Asian Indian, 5%; and Asian, 10%. Abdominal fat (L1-L5) was estimated from whole-body scanning using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA Abd-Fat).

RESULTS:

DXA Abd-Fat varied by race/ethnicity after accounting for WC and height in both women and men. The increase in DXA Abd-Fat per increase in WC was lower in the Asian and Asian-Indian women than that in the other women. The increase in DXA Abd-Fat per increase in WC was higher in the AA men and lower in the Asian-Indian men than that in the other men. These differential race/ethnicity effects were most notable when WC exceeded ≍90 cm in the women and ≍100 cm in the men, values which are consistent with current definitions of abdominal obesity in the United States.

CONCLUSIONS:

Prediction equations for abdominal fat using WC that do not account for race/ethnicity group provide biased estimates. These results may affect assessment of disease risk from abdominal obesity among racial/ethnic groups.

PMID:
21364481
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3179798
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk