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Virology. 2011 Apr 25;413(1):39-46. doi: 10.1016/j.virol.2011.01.033. Epub 2011 Feb 25.

HIV-1 replication and gene expression occur at higher levels in neonatal blood naive and memory T-lymphocytes compared with adult blood cells.

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  • 1Department of Immunobiology, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA. nafees@u.arizona.edu

Abstract

Our previous study has shown that HIV-1 replicated at higher levels in neonatal (cord) blood monocytes/macrophages and T-lymphocytes compared with adult blood cells. However, it is not known whether this differential HIV-1 replication also occurs in naive and/or memory T-lymphocytes. We, therefore, compared HIV-1 replication in CD3(+) and CD4(+) naive (CD45RA(+)) and memory (CD45RO(+)) T-lymphocytes isolated from five cord and adult blood donors. We found that HIV-1 replicated at higher levels in both CD3(+) and CD4(+) CD45RA(+) and CD45RO(+) T-lymphocytes isolated from cord blood compared with adult blood. In addition, there was no difference in the cell surface expression of CD4, CXCR4 and CCR5 on cord blood CD45RA(+) and CD45RO(+) T-lymphocytes compared with adult blood cells. Furthermore, we found that there was an increase in HIV-1 gene expression in cord blood CD45RA(+) and CD45RO(+) T-lymphocytes compared with adult blood cells by using a single-cycle replication competent HIV-1-NL4-3-Env(-)R(+) luciferase amphotropic virus, which measures HIV-1 transcriptional activity independent of CD4 and CXCR4 or CCR5 expression. In summary, HIV-1 replicated at higher levels in cord blood CD45RA(+) and CD45RO(+) T-lymphocytes compared with adult blood cells and this differential replication is influenced at the level of HIV-1 gene expression.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21353282
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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