Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Occup Environ Med. 2011 Oct;68(10):753-8. doi: 10.1136/oem.2010.057646. Epub 2011 Feb 17.

The role of work ability in the relationship between aerobic capacity and sick leave: a mediation analysis.

Author information

  • 1Department of Public and Occupational Health, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To examine: (1) the relationships between aerobic capacity, work ability and sick leave; (2) the potential mediating effect of work ability in the relationship between aerobic capacity and sick leave; and (3) the influence of age on these relationships.

METHODS:

Information on aerobic capacity (predicted VO(2max)), age, gender, type of work, cardiovascular risk and body mass index was collected from 580 workers at baseline. Work ability was assessed with the Work Ability Index at first follow-up (mean 3.4±1.3 years after baseline). The second follow-up period was defined as the time between completing the Work Ability Index and the first registered sick leave episode. Mediation analyses were performed using linear and Cox regression models.

RESULTS:

A lower aerobic capacity was found to be significantly related to sick leave (HR=0.98; τ=-0.018; 95% CI 0.970 to 0.994). There was a significant positive relationship between aerobic capacity and work ability (α=0.165; 95% CI 0.122 to 0.208). Also, lower work ability was significantly related to sick leave after controlling for aerobic capacity (HR=0.97; β=-0.033; 95% CI 0.949 to 0.987). The mediating effect of work ability in the relationship between aerobic capacity and sick leave was -0.005 (SE=0.002), and mediated 27.8% (95% CI 10.4 to 45.2) of the total effect of aerobic capacity on sick leave. Age did not influence the relationship between aerobic capacity and sick leave.

CONCLUSIONS:

Fit workers had better work ability, and both fit workers and workers with higher work ability were at lower risk of starting an episode of sick leave.

PMID:
21330573
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk