Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
Bioeng Bugs. 2010 May-Jun;1(3):164-71. doi: 10.4161/bbug.1.3.10619. Epub 2009 Nov 13.

Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for lactose/whey fermentation.

Author information

  • 1IBB-Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre of Biological Engineering, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, Braga, Portugal. luciliad@deb.uminho.pt

Abstract

Lactose is an interesting carbon source for the production of several bio-products by fermentation, primarily because it is the major component of cheese whey, the main by-product of dairy activities. However, the microorganism more widely used in industrial fermentation processes, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, does not have a lactose metabolization system. Therefore, several metabolic engineering approaches have been used to construct lactose-consuming S. cerevisiae strains, particularly involving the expression of the lactose genes of the phylogenetically related yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, but also the lactose genes from Escherichia coli and Aspergillus niger, as reviewed here. Due to the existing large amounts of whey, the production of bio-ethanol from lactose by engineered S. cerevisiae has been considered as a possible route for whey surplus. Emphasis is given in the present review on strain improvement for lactose-to-ethanol bioprocesses, namely flocculent yeast strains for continuous high-cell-density systems with enhanced ethanol productivity.

© 2010 Landes Bioscience

KEYWORDS:

bio-ethanol; cheese whey; fermentation; lactose; metabolic engineering; recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

PMID:
21326922
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3026421
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (1)Free text

Figure 1
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Landes Bioscience Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk