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Fertil Steril. 2011 Apr;95(5):1655-60. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2011.01.019.

Follicle-stimulating hormone administered at the time of human chorionic gonadotropin trigger improves oocyte developmental competence in in vitro fertilization cycles: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

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  • 1Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, University of California, San Francisco, California 94115, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether an additional follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) bolus administered at the time of the human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) trigger can improve the developmental competence of the oocyte.

DESIGN:

Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial.

SETTING:

Academic medical center.

PATIENT(S):

Women undergoing a long agonist suppression in vitro fertilization (IVF) protocol for treatment of infertility.

INTERVENTION(S):

FSH bolus at time of hCG trigger versus placebo.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Primary outcome; fertilization; secondary outcomes: oocyte recovery, implantation rate, and clinical and ongoing pregnancy/live birth rates.

RESULT(S):

A total of 188 women (mean age: 36.2 years; range: 25 to 40 years) were randomized. Fertilization (2PN/#oocyte) was statistically significantly improved in the treatment arm (63% vs. 55%) as was the likelihood of oocyte recovery (70% vs. 57%). There was no statistically significant difference in clinical pregnancy rate (56.8% vs. 46.2%) or ongoing/live birth rate (51.6% vs. 43.0%).

CONCLUSION(S):

Improvements in IVF success rates have largely been due to optimization of embryo culture and stimulation protocols; less attention has been directed toward methods to improve induction of final oocyte maturation. This was the first randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to modify the ovulation trigger to improve oocyte competence, as demonstrated by the statistically significant improvement in fertilization.

Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21315341
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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