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J Nutr Educ Behav. 2011 May-Jun;43(3):150-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jneb.2009.12.009. Epub 2011 Feb 5.

Beliefs about cancer and diet among those considering genetic testing for colon cancer.

Author information

  • 1MacMillan Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. aunchalee.palmquist@yale.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess beliefs about the role of diet in cancer prevention among individuals considering genetic testing for Lynch Syndrome.

DESIGN:

Family-centered, cascade recruitment; baseline assessment of a longitudinal study.

SETTING:

Clinical research setting.

PARTICIPANTS:

Participants were 390 persons, ages 18 and older, including persons with a Lynch Syndrome-associated cancer and suspected of carrying a disease causing mutation, and relatives at risk for inheriting a previously identified mutation.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Assess clustering of beliefs about the role of diet in cancer prevention and predictors of class membership.

ANALYSIS:

Confirmatory factor analysis; 2-class factor mixture model with binary indicators; multilevel regression analyses, individuals nested within families.

RESULTS:

Women endorsed a relationship between diet and cancer prevention more often than men (P < .01). A 2-class model was used where Class 1 indicated less likely to link cancer to diet, and Class 2 indicated more likely. Factors associated with increased odds of membership in Class 1 expressed belief that nothing can prevent cancer (P < .01) and fate attribution (P < .01); Class 2 mentioned personal cancer history (P < .05) and genetic knowledge (P < .01).

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS:

Identifying factors associated with a belief in cancer prevention through dietary behaviors can inform targeted interventions.

Copyright © 2011 Society for Nutrition Education. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21296025
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3090483
Free PMC Article
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