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Biol Res Nurs. 2012 Jan;14(1):48-54. doi: 10.1177/1099800410395569. Epub 2011 Jan 28.

Insufficient sleep in young patients with diabetes and their families.

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  • 1Institute for Endocrine Discovery and Clinical Care, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We examined sleep in families of individuals with type 1 diabetes and the relationship of sleep with obesity, diabetes, and insulin resistance.

METHODS:

Probands with type 1 diabetes diagnosed before age 18 and first- and second-degree relatives were included (n = 323). Demographic, anthropometric and clinical variables, and self-reported sleep duration and napping were assessed.

RESULTS:

On average, adults (≥20 years) slept 7.5 (SD 1.5) hr, whereas children (5-11 years) and adolescents (12-19 years) slept 9.8 (SD 1.1) and 8.5 (SD 1.9) hr, respectively (p < .01). Based on national recommendations, 40.9% of participants slept insufficiently, particularly young people (vs. adults, p < .01). In age-group stratified analysis, there were no significant associations of insufficient sleep or sleep duration with obesity, diabetes status, or insulin resistance after adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, and gender. In all, 42% of participants reported napping regularly (≥1/week), with adolescents significantly more likely to do so (vs. adults, odds ratio [OR] = 1.95, p < .01). Non-Hispanic Blacks and Hispanics also had higher odds of regular napping (vs. non-Hispanic Whites, OR = 3.74, p < .01 and OR = 2.52, p = .03, respectively). In adjusted analysis, leaner (vs. obese) adolescents, whether measured by body mass index, percentage body fat, or waist circumference, were significantly more likely to nap regularly.

CONCLUSIONS:

We found that insufficient sleep was significantly more likely in children and adolescents compared with adults in families with type 1 diabetes. Lower adiposity was associated with regular napping in adolescents. The high prevalence of insufficient sleep in young patients with type 1 diabetes and their relatives detected in the current study may have significant health consequences.

PMID:
21278167
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3617552
Free PMC Article

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