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Prev Med. 2011 Mar-Apr;52(3-4):254-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.01.006. Epub 2011 Jan 27.

Depressive symptoms and self-reported fast-food intake in midlife women.

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  • 1Department of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the association between depressive symptoms and fast-food intake in midlife women.

METHODS:

Data were analyzed from a cross-sectional study of 626 women aged 45-54 years conducted from 2000 to 2004 in Baltimore, Maryland. The presence of depressive symptoms was measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale and defined as a score of 16 or greater. The frequency of fast-food intake was assessed using self-reported questionnaire data, and was categorized as "at least weekly", "at least monthly, but less than weekly" and "less than monthly".

RESULTS:

Approximately 25% of the study sample reported depressive symptoms; 14% consumed fast-food "at least weekly," and 27% "at least monthly, but less than weekly". Compared to their counterparts, women with depressive symptoms had significantly greater odds of reporting higher fast-food intake (confounder-adjusted odds ratio: 1.54; 95% confidence interval: 1.06-2.25). Other covariates associated with a higher frequency of fast-food intake included black race and body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2).

CONCLUSIONS:

Findings from this study indicate that the presence of depressive symptoms is positively associated with fast-food intake in midlife women. These results may have important health implications given that both depression and dietary consumption patterns are risk factors for a number of diseases.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21276813
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3062726
Free PMC Article
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