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Resuscitation. 2011 Apr;82(4):464-7. doi: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2010.12.011. Epub 2011 Jan 26.

Glidescope(®) videolaryngoscope improves intubation success rate in cardiac arrest scenarios without chest compressions interruption: a randomized cross-over manikin study.

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  • 1Department of Anatomy, University of Athens, Medical School, 75 Mikras Asias Street, 11527, Athens, Greece. theodorosxanthos@yahoo.com

Abstract

AIM:

The aim of this study was to assess the performance of the Glidescope(®) in a manikin cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) scenario.

METHODS:

Following a brief didactic session, 45 volunteer doctors inexperienced with airway management, attempted to intubate a manikin using a Macintosh laryngoscope and Glidescope(®) with uninterrupted and without chest compressions. Primary endpoints were intubation times and success rate with each device. Dental compression and level of self-confidence in using each device were also assessed.

RESULTS:

In the scenario without chest compressions the cumulative success rate related to time to intubation was significantly higher with the Macintosh blade than with the Glidescope(®) (p<0.001). On the contrary, in the scenario with continuous chest compressions, the cumulative rate related to time to intubation was significantly higher with the Glidescope(®) (p=0.035). Significantly fewer attempts were required for the first successful intubation with the Macintosh blade in the non-CPR scenario versus the CPR scenario (p=0.007). Moreover, the number of attempts for the first successful intubation was significantly lower for the Glidescope(®) in the non-CPR (p=0.001) and the CPR scenario (p<0.001). Dental compression was significantly lower with the Glidescope(®) in both scenarios (p<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Using the GlideScope(®) in a manikin CPR scenario provides extremely high intubation success rates in short times with the first attempt, in medical practitioners inexperienced in intubation.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

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PMID:
21272986
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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