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J Immunol. 2011 Mar 1;186(5):2959-69. doi: 10.4049/jimmunol.1000112. Epub 2011 Jan 26.

Ubiquitylation of an internalized killer cell Ig-like receptor by Triad3A disrupts sustained NF-κB signaling.

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  • 1Institute for Cancer Research, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA 19111, USA.

Abstract

Killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR) with two Ig-like domains and a long cytoplasmic domain 4 (2DL4; CD158d) is a unique KIR expressed on human NK cells, which stimulates cytokine production, but mechanisms regulating its expression and function are poorly understood. By yeast two-hybrid screening, we identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase, Triad3A, as an interaction partner for the 2DL4 cytoplasmic domain. The protein interaction was confirmed in vivo, and Triad3A expression induced polyubiquitylation and degradation of 2DL4. Overexpression of Triad3A selectively abrogated the cytokine-producing function of 2DL4, whereas Triad3A short hairpin RNA reversed ubiquitylation and restored cytokine production. Expression of Triad3A in an NK cell line did not affect receptor surface expression, internalization, or early signaling, but significantly reduced receptor turnover and suppressed sustained NF-κB activation. 2DL4 endocytosis was found to be vital to stimulate cytokine production, and Triad3A expression diminished localization of internalized receptor in early endosomes. Our results reveal a critical role for endocytosed 2DL4 receptor to generate sustained NF-κB signaling and drive cytokine production. We conclude that Triad3A is a key negative regulator of sustained 2DL4-mediated NF-κB signaling from internalized 2DL4, which functions by promoting ubiquitylation and degradation of endocytosed receptor from early endosomes.

PMID:
21270397
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3079396
Free PMC Article

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