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Obstet Gynecol. 2011 Feb;117(2 Pt 1):251-5. doi: 10.1097/AOG.0b013e31820788d7.

Nongenetic factors associated with stress urinary incontinence.

Author information

  • 1Division of Urogynecology, NorthShore University HealthSystem, The University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Evanston, IL 60201, USA. aimeenguyn@yahoo.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To explore the role of hereditary and environmental factors on the development of stress urinary incontinence in a large cohort of identical and nonidentical twins.

METHODS:

This is a large, population-based, classic twin study of twin sisters recruited to complete a health survey at the world's largest annual twins festival during 2003-2008. Concordance rates were calculated and structural equation models were used to estimate the contribution of genetic effects compared with environmental factors toward the development of stress urinary incontinence.

RESULTS:

Eight hundred eighty-two twin sister pairs (n=1,764), including 765 identical and 117 nonidentical twin sister pairs, completed the questionnaires. Sequential structural equation modeling revealed that common environmental factors contributed 77.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 41.4-83.8; P<.001) of the variance and unique environmental factors contributed 20.9% (95% CI, 15.8-26.7; P<.001) of the variance. The effect of genetics was not statistically significant at 1.49% (95% CI, 0.0-38.8; P=.46).

CONCLUSION:

Female stress urinary incontinence is more a consequence of environmental risk factors than heredity. This epidemiologic insight should be considered in preventive health efforts.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

II.

PMID:
21252736
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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