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J Orthop Trauma. 2011 Feb;25(2):110-5. doi: 10.1097/BOT.0b013e3181d9e875.

Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis of the distal fibula with the locking compression plate: first experience of 20 cases.

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  • 1Department of Surgery, Trauma Unit, Kantonsspital Graub√ľnden, Chur.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical feasibility and the possible complications associated with minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis of the distal fibula.

DESIGN/SETTING:

Regional county hospital.

PATIENTS/PARTICIPANTS:

All patients with Orthopaedic Trauma Association 42, 43, 44 fractures of the distal tibia requiring plate fixation of the distal fibula were included in this cohort study. A consecutive series of 701 internally fixed fractures of tibia and ankle yielded 20 fibular fractures treated with this technique.

INTERVENTION:

Fractures were treated with the minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis technique using an angular stable screw-plate system for the fibula.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS:

Clinical and radiologic outcomes at 24 months.

RESULTS:

Seventeen fractures healed without complication at an average of 9 weeks. Three aseptic nonunions were recorded: one in a pilon fracture (Orthopaedic Trauma Association 43-C3) and one in a distal lower leg fracture (Orthopaedic Trauma Association 43-A3), both with severe closed soft tissue injury (as a result of a crush mechanism). The third one was in an ankle fracture dislocation (OTA 44-C1) with delayed treatment and inadequate reduction of the simple fibula fracture.

CONCLUSION:

Although this technique is comparable to minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis in the tibia or femur, it appears to be more difficult as a result of small bone size. As a result, we reserve this technique for selected complex fractures of the distal fibula with critical soft tissue conditions.

PMID:
21245715
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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