Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Sleep Med Rev. 2011 Aug;15(4):259-67. doi: 10.1016/j.smrv.2010.10.001. Epub 2011 Jan 14.

The role and validity of actigraphy in sleep medicine: an update.

Author information

  • The Adler Center for Research in Child Development and Psychopathology, Department of Psychology, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel. sadeh@post.tau.ac.il

Abstract

Activity-based sleep-wake monitoring or actigraphy has gained a central role as a sleep assessment tool in sleep medicine. It is used for sleep assessment in clinical sleep research, and as a diagnostic tool in sleep medicine. This update indicates that according to most studies, actigraphy has reasonable validity and reliability in normal individuals with relatively good sleep patterns. The validity of actigraphy in special populations or with individuals with poor sleep or with other sleep-related disorders is more questionable. The most problematic validity issue is the low specificity of actigraphy in detecting wakefulness within sleep periods reported with certain devices or samples. Overall, the recent literature adds to previous reports in demonstrating that actigraphy is sensitive in detecting unique sleep patterns associated with specific sleep disorders as well as with other medical or neurobehavioral disorders. Furthermore, actigraphy is sensitive in detecting sleep changes associated with drug treatments and non-pharmacologic interventions. Recent developments include the development of devices specially tailored to detect periodic limb movement in sleep and the introduction of new devices and algorithms. Because of the limitations of actigraphy, it is recommended to use complementary assessment methods (objective and subjective) whenever possible.

Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21237680
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk