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Prim Care Diabetes. 2011 Jul;5(2):125-9. doi: 10.1016/j.pcd.2010.12.001. Epub 2011 Jan 12.

Factors associated with achieving a weight loss goal among participants in an adapted Diabetes Prevention Program.

Author information

  • 1Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Helena, MT 59620-2951, USA. tharwell@mt.gov

Abstract

AIMS:

To assess the factors associated with achieving the 7% weight loss goal among participants enrolled in an adapted Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP).

METHODS:

Adults at high-risk (N=989) for CVD and diabetes were enrolled in the lifestyle intervention. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with achieving the weight loss goal.

RESULTS:

Overall 37% of participants achieved the weight loss goal. Participants who were older, male, had a lower baseline BMI, self-monitored their fat and caloric intake more frequently, and who achieved higher levels of physical activity were more likely to achieve the weight loss goal compared to participants without these characteristics. In multivariate analyses more frequent self-monitoring of fat and caloric intake and higher levels of weekly physical activity were the only factors independently associated with participant achievement of the weight loss goal.

CONCLUSIONS:

In a real-world translation of the DPP lifestyle intervention participants who achieved the weight loss goal were more likely to have monitored their dietary intake frequently and increased their physical activity markedly both in a dose-response relationship. Our findings highlight the importance of supporting participants in lifestyle interventions to initiate and maintain dietary self-monitoring and increased levels of physical activity.

Copyright © 2010 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21233033
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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