Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Pediatr. 2011 May;158(5):727-34. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2010.11.052. Epub 2011 Jan 13.

Adolescent obesity, bone mass, and cardiometabolic risk factors.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA 30912, USA. npollock@mcg.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare bone mass between overweight adolescents with and without cardiometabolic risk factors (CMR). Associations of bone mass with CMR and adiposity were also determined.

STUDY DESIGN:

Adolescents (aged 14 to 18 years) who were overweight were classified as healthy (n = 55), having one CMR (1CMR; n = 46), or having two or more CMR (≥2CMR; n = 42). CMRs were measured with standard methods and defined according to pediatric definitions of metabolic syndrome. Total body bone mass, fat mass, and fat-free soft tissue mass were measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Visceral adipose tissue and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue were assessed with magnetic resonance imaging.

RESULTS:

After controlling for age, sex, race, height, and fat-free soft tissue mass, the healthy group had 5.4% and 6.3% greater bone mass than the 1CMR and ≥2CMR groups, respectively (both P values <.04). With multiple linear regression, adjusting for the same co-variates, visceral adipose tissue (β = -0.22), waist circumference (β = -0.23), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (β = -0.23), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level (β = 0.22) were revealed to be associated with bone mass (all P values <.04). There was a trend toward a significant inverse association between bone mass and fasting glucose level (P = .056). No relations were found between bone mass and fat mass, subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue, blood pressure, or triglyceride level.

CONCLUSION:

Being overweight with metabolic abnormalities, particularly insulin resistance, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, and visceral adiposity, may adversely influence adolescent bone mass.

Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

Comment in

PMID:
21232765
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3383822
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk