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Allergy Asthma Immunol Res. 2011 Jan;3(1):53-7. doi: 10.4168/aair.2011.3.1.53. Epub 2010 Nov 23.

Nutritional status according to sensitized food allergens in children with atopic dermatitis.

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  • 1Atopy Clinic, Seoul Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Food allergies can affect the growth and nutritional status of children with atopic dermatitis (AD). This study was conducted to determine the association between the number of sensitized food allergens and the growth and nutritional status of infants and young children with AD.

METHODS:

We studied 165 children with AD, aged 5 to 47 months, and who visited the Atopy Clinic of the Seoul Medical Center. We recorded the birth weight, time at which food weaning began, scoring of atopic dermatitis (SCORAD) index, eosinophil counts in peripheral blood, and total serum IgE and specific IgE to six major allergens (egg white, cow's milk, soybean, peanut, wheat, and fish). The height and weight for age and weight for height were converted to z-scores to evaluate their effects on growth and nutritional status. Specific IgE levels ≥0.7 kUA/L, measured via the CAP assay, were considered positive.

RESULTS:

As the number of sensitized food allergens increased, the mean z-scores of weight and height for age decreased (P=0.006 and 0.018, respectively). The number directly correlated with the SCORAD index (r=0.308), time at which food weaning began (r=0.332), eosinophil counts in peripheral blood (r=0.266), and total serum IgE (r=0.394). Inverse correlations were observed with the z-scores of weight for age (r=-0.358), height for age (r=-0.278), and weight for height (r=-0.224).

CONCLUSIONS:

A higher number of sensitized food allergens was associated with negative effects on the growth and nutritional status of infants and young children with AD. Therefore, a thorough evaluation of both growth and nutritional status, combined with adequate patient management, is crucial in pediatric AD patients presenting with numerous sensitized food allergies.

KEYWORDS:

Dermatitis atopic; food hypersensitivity; growth; nutritional status

PMID:
21217926
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3005320
Free PMC Article

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