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Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2011 Mar;20(3):537-44. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-10-1099. Epub 2011 Jan 6.

A prospective evaluation of C-reactive protein levels and colorectal adenoma development.

Author information

  • 1Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, New York, NY 10461, USA. marc.gunter@einstein.yu.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Inflammation is hypothesized to play a role in colorectal tumorigenesis. Circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a serologic marker of the inflammatory response, have been positively associated with colorectal cancer development in some studies; however, there are limited data on the relation of CRP with colorectal adenomas, established precursors of colorectal cancer.

METHODS:

A nested case-control investigation of CRP levels and incident colorectal adenoma was conducted in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, a randomized trial of 154,942 individuals designed to test the efficacy of flexible sigmoidoscopy on colorectal cancer mortality when performed once, and then repeated 3 to 5 years later. Serum CRP levels were measured in baseline blood specimens from participants who were free of polyps in the left-sided colorectum at the baseline screening procedure, but who were found at the subsequent screen to have at least one colorectal adenoma (n=356), and in a set of polyp-free, frequency-matched controls (n=396).

RESULTS:

In a multivariable logistic regression model that included established colorectal adenoma risk factors, a 1-unit increase in log CRP level was associated with a 15% reduction in risk of developing colorectal adenoma (OR=0.85, 95% CI, 0.75-0.98, Ptrend=0.01). This association did not differ according to body size, smoking behavior, gender, use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, or adenoma location.

CONCLUSIONS:

High circulating CRP levels may be protective against colorectal adenoma development.

IMPACT:

Though at contrast with mechanistic data on inflammation and colorectal tumorigenesis, this finding is not inconsistent with prior results on CRP and colorectal adenoma and warrants further investigation.

©2011 AACR.

PMID:
21212059
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3051036
Free PMC Article
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