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J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2011 Jan;93(1):68-72. doi: 10.1302/0301-620X.93B1.24532.

Long-term results of tension-band laminoplasty for cervical stenotic myelopathy: a ten-year follow-up.

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  • 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Saitama Medical Center, 1981, Kamoda, Kawagoe, Saitama, 350-8550, Japan. tmotosuneya@yahoo.co.jp

Abstract

We reviewed 75 patients (57 men and 18 women), who had undergone tension-band laminoplasty for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (42 patients) or compression myelopathy due to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (33 patients) and had been followed for more than ten years. Clinical and functional results were estimated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association score. The rate of recovery and the level of postoperative axial neck pain were also recorded. The pre- and post-operative alignment of the cervical spine (Ishihara curve index indicating lordosis of the cervical spine) and the range of movement (ROM) of the cervical spine were also measured. The mean rate of recovery of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association score at final follow-up was 52.1% (SD 24.6) and significant axial pain was reported by 19 patients (25.3%). Axial pain was reported more frequently in patients with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament than in those with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (p = 0.027). A kyphotic deformity was not seen post-operatively in any patient. The mean ROM decreased post-operatively from 32.8° (SD 12.3) to 16.2° (SD 12.3) (p < 0.001). The mean ROM ratio was 46.9% (SD 28.1) for all the patients. The mean ROM ratio was lower in patients with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament than in those with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (p < 0.001). Compared to those with cervical spondylotic myelopathy, patients with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament had less ROM and more post-operative axial neck pain.

PMID:
21196546
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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